Curatorial | d3 International Competitions

Since 2010, Ji Young has been a co-director of competitions and advisory board member of d3, a New York-based organization committed to innovation in art, architecture and interior design which provides collaborative opportunities for artists, architects, designers, and students from around the world.

d3 Housing Tomorrow (www.d3space.org/competitions/)

Courtesy of d3

Excerpt from d3’s Mission Statement:

Exploration of contextual, cultural, and life cycle flows offers a critical lens for visualizing new housing strategies for living in the future. Among the most acclaimed speculative housing awards, the annual d3 Housing Tomorrow international competition invites architects, designers, engineers, and students to collectively explore, document, analyze, transform, and deploy innovative approaches to residential urbanism, architecture, interiors, and designed objects.

The 2016 competition calls for transformative solutions that advance sustainable thought, building performance, and social interaction through study of intrinsic environmental geometries, social behaviors, urban implications, and programmatic flows. Special emphasis may be placed on housing concepts that investigate dialogues including engagement of internal/external socio-economic diversity, change/adaptability over time, public/private spatial connectivity, and permanence/impermanence of materials. d3 challenges participants to rethink strategies for investigating residential design from macro-to-micro scales ranging from urban—promoting broader physical interconnectivity; communal—exploiting an interaction of units with shared facilities; and internal—examining the interior particularity of the unit, individual, or family in housing design toward promoting identity, ownership, and intimacy.

An architecture of emergence suggests that design expression requires purpose beyond formal assumption and aesthetic experimentation itself. Concurrent with sustainable thought, the d3 Housing Tomorrow competition assumes that architecture does not simply form, but rather perform various functions beyond those conventionally associated with residential buildings. Accordingly, design submissions must be environmentally responsible while fostering inventive conceptual living solutions for today and tomorrow. Although proposals should be technologically feasible, they may suggest fantastical architectural visions of a sustainable residential future.

The d3 Housing Tomorrow competition allows designers freedom to approach their creative process in a scale-appropriate manner, from large-scale master planning endeavors, to individual building concepts, to notions of the interior realm. Although there are no restrictions on site, scale, program, or residential building typology, proposals should carefully address their selected context.

 

Natural Systems, Co-Director

Courtesy of d3

Excerpt from d3’s Mission Statement:

The study of natural systems offers architects and designers significant potential as a platform for alternative, ecologically-performative design strategies. The d3 Natural Systems competition invites architects, designers, engineers, and students to collectively explore the potential of analyzing, documenting, and deploying nature-based influences in architecture, urbanism, interiors, and designed objects.

Established in 2009, the annual d3 Natural Systems competition is an established voice in alternative architecture and one of the most notable awards in speculative, performance-based design. It recognizes exemplary ideas that redefine design as an ecological project through the implementation of advanced technologies, materials, and social interventions that engage adaptability, globalization, and emergence. Published in London-based Wiley-Blackwell AD journal theme issue the New Pastoralism: Landscape into Architecture as a leading example of environmental innovation, the annual d3 Natural Systems competition is a critical voice in ecological architecture and design.
The 2016 competition calls for innovative proposals that advance sustainable thought and performance through the study of intrinsic environmental geometries, behaviors, and flows. By identifying, examining, and applying their structural order on form and function–bottom-up, performance-based solutions for limitless building typologies, functional programs, material conditions, and products may be realized.

Emergence suggests that design expression requires purpose beyond formal assumption and aesthetic experimentation itself. Concurrent with sustainable thought, the d3 Natural Systems competition assumes that architecture and design not simply form, but rather perform various functions beyond those conventionally associated with buildings, spaces, and objects. Submissions must be environmentally responsible while advancing inventive conceptual solutions. Although proposals should be technologically feasible, they may suggest fantastical visions of a sustainable global future.

 

d3 Unbuilt Visions, Jury Member

Courtesy of d3

Excerpt from d3’s Mission Statement:

Unbuilt Visions promotes critical debate about architecture and design by acknowledging excellence in unbuilt projects. This annual competition provides an opportunity to engage with architecture, urbanism, interiors, and designed objects at the conceptual stage by recognizing work that offers a critical contribution to worldwide architectural discourse.

Throughout time, unbuilt projects have exerted significant influence on the trajectory of global architecture and design. Etienne-Louis Boullee monolithic Cenotaph for Newton expressed a sublime grandeur than continues to beguile contemporary architects. LeCorbusier’s utopian Ville Radieuse (1924) proposed a blueprint for social reform that radically transformed the design of 20th century cities worldwide. Mies van der Rohe’s austere concept for the Friedrichstrasse Skyscraper Competition (1921) fostered a change in our perceptions and expectations of the modern commercial workplace.
Continual shifts in architectural theory and production drive new desires to create and address untapped opportunities. Reflecting forces of globalization and crisis, contemporary architects and designers are negotiating new territories, defining alternative approaches, and engaging untested methodologies. The increasingly multidisciplinary nature of our work has become more experimental, while correspondingly less classifiable. In an era of significant technological innovation, speculative projects offer vast potential for advancing theoretical discourse, as well as alternative ways to intervene within the built environment. Yet there are inherent risks and challenges attached to exploring uncharted frontiers.

In the 21st century, which unbuilt ideas will reflect the most salient and avant-garde notions of our time?